Project Lifecycle

Musings of a Sitecore Developing Man

April 25, 2014

Prologue

This article is about the theory of template development. A topic, which at its best, is dry and wonkish. My goal is to provoke thought and discussion but mostly to prevent others from having to continuously wander through this hedge maze until they invariably come to the same end. Besides that, there may be a better solution still that someone else has come up with.

Act I

Recently, on a particularly frigid night in Boston, while milling around after the New England Sitecore User Group, I was speaking to Rick Cabral about his ORM Diamond. I mentioned that I thought he was right to c

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TestStar - A Web and Unit Testing SDK

April 5, 2014

Diatribe

I began working with web testing years ago with the MS Test framework when I got a version of Visual Studio that allowed it's use. I started small and began building simple ping tests. Over time it developed into a tool would run sets of tests daily and fed the results into a blog that I could read every morning. It tought me a lot but eventually I hit too many limitations. License cost being the most obvious but also I couldn't create a custom interface for it. I had to work within Visual Studio and the UI was too blunt. This forced me to finally bite the bullet and start converting

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Sheer UI: 4 - Building a Wizard

February 1, 2014

Prefacio

I've finally come full circle. I initially intended to write about a pre-existing wizard that I rebuilt before I found out about xaml controls. Ignore the irony about writing a series on using xaml controls and giving the final how-to article using the old controls but I did build the wizard(s) before I discovered the system; so there's that. Also, as I mentioned at the end of the first article, there's a sample tutorial wizard provided by Sitecore, built using the new xaml controls which can be used if you're up to converting it.

Since I began, I've built three more wizards for myself.

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Sheer UI: 3 - Syntax and Controls

January 5, 2014

The previous articles explained what Sheer UI was and how to do basic integrations into your system but what else can it do? There's a good deal of syntax that is supported and a number of useful controls at your disposal.

Extension Tags

These are custom tags defined in the XamlSharp.config that modify the local page. They're unique only to the "xamlControls". They can provide action elements with logic statements similar to XSL. You also have the ability to reference class libraries to support custom web controls, set variables and attach attribute values to

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Sheer UI: 2 - Hello World

January 5, 2014

With the previous article explaining a bit about what Sheer UI is, setting up a hello world will make much more sense. For this, I'm going to setup the XML control and supporting class file and then give examples of calling them from Applications and Item Editor Tabs

Code Behind

Let's start by creating the class file that is referenced by the XML control. I'll provide an example for both the "control" and "xamlControls" types below.

"control" example

I created a class named HelloWorld and it will inherit from the Sitecore.Web.UI.Sheer.BaseForm in the Sitecore.Kernel assembly. There are also

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Sheer UI: 1 - A Tale of Two Systems

January 5, 2014

Preface

My journey began with a rebuild of a Sheer UI Wizard. I didn't build it, but I was about to learn to. After finding a dearth of literature on Sheer and realizing the documentation was a little out of date (I'm guessing SC 4), I knew I was going to write something on it. When I began writing I thought I knew a fair amount about Sheer from my experience creating different utilities but as it turns out, I knew very little. Though, from some of the applications I've seen, there seems to be a few who have faced the abyss and become steely Sheer developers, I'm betting there are more like mys

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Designing a Page Editor Experience: 4 - Personalization and Multivariate Testing

October 10, 2013

One of the nicest features that came along in the last few Sitecore versions was the rules engine. Along with that power was the ability to harness the conditional sublayout rendering to change the datasource or component design based on specific visitor information, otherwise known as personalization. There's all kinds of identifiable markers that are available to you about your end users such as location and search keywords. You can use this information as is to create rules, you can create "profiles" which categorize your users to help you reach your intended audience and you can use those

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Designing a Page Editor Experience: 3 - Placeholder Settings

September 27, 2013

Placeholder settings are used to create predefined insert options for components (sublayouts, renderings and web controls). You have two basic approaches to use: setting the placeholder key on the item's Placeholder Key field: 

 

or setting the key when you apply it to an item through it's presentation details.

Setting the placeholder key on the placeholder settings item will set the component insert options of any placeholders with a matching key. This could be useful for global elements or in single site deployments where you're not concerned about managing individual settings for each site.

Se

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Designing a Page Editor Experience: 2 - Sublayout fields

September 20, 2013

After you've decided what components your pages will be broken up into and created the sublayouts (renderings or server controls) each extending your base class, you can begin working on the setup inside Sitecore by configuring your component item's fields and setting up component insert options. These settings are stored on the sublayout items themselves and I'll detail them here.

The "Description" field is largely for you to provide a description of what the control does. I'm not aware of any place it is displayed but it's possible that it has other uses.

The "Parameter Templates" is one of

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Designing a Page Editor Experience: 1 - Setting up the Code

September 20, 2013

Shout Out

As a shout out, this series started because I was recently speaking with Mark Ursino and he gave me a demonstration of a recent build where he had taken advantage of a few really slick features in Page Editor. I decided to do some research to see what Page Editor could really do. In doing my research I came across a lot of great posts that individually detail pieces of functionality, some of which I'd seen demonstrated at the last Symposium. Others go in depth to explain why certain choices are lend to a better framework. For this post, I wanted to weave together as much of a cohesive

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